ranchmagazine.com

  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Sheep & Goat Fund

Welcome to Ranch & Rural Living

Grown in Gillespie County

E-mail Print PDF

The Area of Central Texas Settled by German Immigrants
Produces Peaches, Berries, Grapes and More

Published June 2014

Shops along Main Street in Fredericksburg draw visitors, but so do the county’s peaches and wines. Photo courtesy Fredericksburg Convention and Visitors Bureau. When, in 1845, German settler John Meusebach set out from New Braunfels, Texas, and traveled 60 miles northwest to select the second settlement of the Fisher-Miller Land Grant, he chose well. He selected a valley situated between two creeks, now known as Barons Creek and Town Creek, and surrounded by seven hills. He named the settlement Fredericksburg, after Prince Frederick of Prussia, a kingdom in what is now northwestern Germany.

The rich farmland around the new settlement would allow the new Texans from Germany to prosper, both in livestock production and farming.

Today, agriculture is an important part of the Fredericksburg area’s economy. According to the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, ag production and related industry in Gillespie County averaged nearly $50 million annually between 2008 and 2011. Half of that total came from beef cattle production. The agriculture industry in the county employs nearly 1,000 residents, with an annual payroll of nearly $7 million.

Though peach growers have been through some tough years of drought, they are still at it, producing some of the best tasting peaches anywhere. Vogel Orchard peaches ready for picking. Photo by Sharla Schmidt.When folks in Texas think about Fredericksburg and the surrounding area, they think about German heritage, wines, beers, picturesque farms in a Hill Country setting, cattle, sheep—and peaches.

Peaches and Fredericksburg go together like bratwurst and sauerkraut.

Read more...
 

Camille Sanders

E-mail Print PDF

Talented Young Texas Singer/Songwriter
From Concan Has Performed Since Age 9

Camille Sanders By Gary Cutrer

Published January 2014

At just 17, country music performer and songwriter Camille Sanders is already a veteran of the music world, if you count the years she’s been singing and playing the fiddle, since age 9. Camille’s most recent performances include acoustic sets with Ace in the Hole Band leader Ronnie Huckaby. Yes, that Ace in the Hole Band, George Strait’s backing group. She released her second CD in April 2013, “Smile.” Her first, a self-titled CD of cover and orginal songs, came out in 2011. The Camille Sanders Band performed a set at the 2011 San Antonio Stock Show and Rodeo and has opened for several big acts.

Though Camille has yet to garner the kind of huge attention that mean’s a performer has “arrived” in Texas and across the country, she has already charted hits in Europe, where, by the way, many people love American country music. And, recently, Camille made her acting debut in a made-for-TV movie starring Dolly Parton.

It was Camille’s maternal grandfather, Howard Yeargan, who spurred her early interest in music, she said. “I started learning how to play the fiddle when I was 9, and we would go from church to church and play gospel shows together and I’d play the fiddle and my grandpa would play the piano.”  Her fiddle playing then was a little rough compared to now, she said. “It was a little squeaky.”

Her fiddle skills improved, and at the same time her grandfather taught her to play the piano. “My grandpa passed away,” she said. “I thought, well, I’m going to continue what we started together, so I learned how to play the guitar.”  She had the music basics down, she said, but she needed some polish. “I needed real good training and stuff so I started training with my fiddle teacher, Dick Walker. And we would work together all throughout the summers trying to get theory and stuff, and I learned how to play the guitar and I started covering songs and writing my own music to play at a show in Concan.”

Read more...
 

Verify the Science

E-mail Print

Photo by Leah Brosig of Seguin, Texas, was an entry in the 2012 Ranch & Rural Living Photo Contest. By Dan Byfield
CEO, American Stewards of Liberty

Published May 2013

Remember Ronald Reagan’s “trust, but verify” quote he used to describe the relationship with the former Soviet Union?  Unfortunately, today, that same guiding principle is required of our own government.

Federal agencies are making policy decisions based on, and consistently using, false, inflated, faulty, manipulated, biased and, in some cases, artificial and manufactured data and science.

In an attempt to scale back this prejudiced practice, Congress enacted the Information Quality Act (IQA) in December 2000, by adding a two-paragraph provision buried in an appropriations bill.  The legislation applied to every federal agency that is subject to the Paper Reduction Act of 1980, which basically means every agency including the office of the President.

The purpose of the IQA is to ensure that federal agencies use and disseminate accurate information.  Specifically, it requires each federal agency to issue information quality guidelines ensuring the quality, utility, objectivity and integrity of information that they disseminate and provide mechanisms for affected persons to correct such information.
For those of us fighting for private property rights against agencies like the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) over endangered species, the ability to provide and demand credible science has become a game-changer.

Federal Agencies Often Try to Make Policy Based on Flawed Science–We Need to Call Them on Their Assertions, Ask for Proof

The Endangered Species Act (ESA) under Section 1533 (b)(1)(A) requires the Secretary of Interior to make determinations for endangered or threatened species “solely on the basis of the best scientific and commercial data available…after taking into account those efforts…being made by any State…or any political subdivision of a State…”
There are two critical parts to this ESA section that need to be focused upon – the “best scientific and commercial data available” and “after taking into account.”

American Stewards of Liberty is a nonprofit, private property rights organization that has figured out how to use many federal land use-type laws to the benefit of landowners and local governments.  In fact, we worked with eight counties and the Permian Basin Petroleum Association to stop the Service from listing a three-inch lizard as endangered and defend the private property rights of all those in a two million-acre region in Texas and New Mexico.

Read more...
 

The Lighter Side of the Frontier

E-mail Print

Nothing says summer relief better than a jump into some cool waters, and when not fishing, the citizens often took advantage of a cool swim. This circa 1900 shot of a family or friends outing reflects the modesty of the age with the full body swim suits, and note how many are staring right into the camera lens. Another smaller group on the river bank prefer to watch.

By Robert F. Bluthardt
Site Manager, Fort Concho National Historic Landmark

Published November 2012

In the last 30 years of the nineteenth century, San Angelo, Texas, developed from a “whiskey village,” serving the soldiers of Fort Concho, to a thriving trade and commercial center, where 6,000 folks lived, worked, and, yes, played! We sometimes forget that the need for recreation, entertainment, and amusement is both timeless and universal. Our ancestors at Fort Concho and in our community made good use of the natural resources, available equipment and their imagination to provide a break from the daily chores and routines we might find unbearable in the modern age. These photos, selected from the fort’s large collection, cover some of that era’s amusements and diversions. Some remain with us, and some have faded away, but all reflect a truly different age.

The bicycle craze captured the nation in the 1890s, and San Angelo was no exception. This staged photo represents the San Angelo Wheelmen, a period bike club. The rock ledges of the Concho River create an impressive background for this serious group. Both the bikes and the horses in the top section would be left behind by the automobile craze a generation later.

Read more...
 

2012 Photo Contest Winners

E-mail Print PDF

People

Published September & October 2012

Every entry in the 2012 Ranch & Rural Living Photo Contest deserves an award, there were so many excellent photographs submitted. Unfortunately, we could only recognize the top picks in the limited space we had available in our print magazine. As usual, we will eventually use many of the fine photos entered by our talented readers in coming months in advertisements and occasionally as covers.

Congratulations to the winners of this year’s contest. All participants should have already received via email a list of winning entries. Displayed here are all winning entries, including ties.

Photos this year were judged by professional photographer Jim Bean of Jim Bean Professional Photography in San Angelo, and by the magazine staff.  Entries were judged on a weighted point system with points awarded by each of our judges independently. Points were tallied, and the entries with greatest number of points won.

From the character study by Connie Thompson in the People category to the beautiful stop motion nature photography of Madolyn Nasworthy’s hummingbird capture in the Animals and Nature category, the entries in this year’s Ranch & Rural Living Photo Contest were interesting, well composed and possessed great eye appeal. You'll find here the winners, from place 1 to 4 of all categories.

Look for other contest photos in future issues in our print magazine's advertisements and articles.  Congratulations again to the winners of this year’s contest. We look forward to many more quality entries in 2013. We'll have online entry available by mid-January 2013. Thanks to all photographers for participating in the contest.

Read more...
 
  • «
  •  Start 
  •  Prev 
  •  1 
  •  2 
  •  3 
  •  4 
  •  5 
  •  Next 
  •  End 
  • »


Page 1 of 5

June 2014

Ranch & Rural Living June 2014

To Subscribe, Click here.
To Advertise, Click here.

Who's Online

We have 103 guests online

 

Texas Sheep and Goat Raisers Association
TEXAS SHEEP AND GOAT RAISERS ASSOCIATION

Rio Grande Electric Cooperative, Inc.
RIO GRANDE ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC.


Goat Books


Finewool and Clippings

Sign in a Norwegian cocktail lounge: “Ladies are requested not to have children in the bar.”